13th Speech in Noise Workshop, 20-21 January 2022, Virtual Conference

SPIN2022 will be online!

Talks will be shared as Zoom webinars and poster sessions will take place in GatherTown. The meeting will start around 9:00 CET, and end around 17:00 CET.


Submissions are now closed!

If you have submitted an abstract, you should have received a decision email from the organisers around 6 December. If not, please contact us.

You will need to prepare your poster as a PDF file and will also receive instructions on how to upload it in due time.


Registration is now open!

You can now register for the Virtual SPIN meeting by clicking here.

This year's registration is free thanks to the generous support of our sponsors. When you register, we will create a conference space for you to access the talks and the poster session.

Note that we will need to make bandwidth pre-reservations that depend on the number of registered participants. So we would appreciate if you registered only if you really intending to attend.

The registration deadline is Sunday 19 December.


Preliminary programme

Keynote Lecture:

“Perceiving and representing voice identity: effects of talker variability and listener familiarity”

Carolyn McGettigan
VoCoLab, University College London, United-Kingdom

Confirmed speakers are:

  • Hans Rutger Bosker
    Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, NL
    Ignoring people at a cocktail party: testing which acoustic characteristics of ignored speech influence attended speech perception
  • Samuel El Bouzaïdi Tiali
    Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Univ. Savoie Mont Blanc, CNRS, LPNC, Grenoble, FR
    Homophone processing during speech-in-speech situation and cognitive control implication
  • Janina Fels
    Institute for Hearing Technology and Acoustics, RWTH Aachen University, DE
    Challenges and methods to design a child-appropriate speech-in-noise experiment in spatial auditory environments for young children
  • Sébastien Ferreira
    Authôt, Ivry, FR
    Prediction of the ASR quality by analysis of the sound environment
  • Anna Fiveash
    Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, INSERM, CNRS, University of Lyon 1, France
    Regular rhythmic primes do not (always) benefit speech-in-noise perception: Evidence for distinct outcomes for temporal attention depending on speech-in-noise manipulations
  • Inga Holube
    Institute of Hearing Technology and Audiology, Jade University of Applied Sciences, Oldenburg, DE
    Text-to-speech and back — new ways in speech audiometry
  • Ulrich Hoppe
    Department of Audiology, ENT-clinic, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, DE
    Speech Recognition in Quiet and in Noise in a large group of Bimodal (CI + HA) Listeners
  • Hae-Sung Jeon
    UCLan, Preston, UK
    Perception of dynamic pitch in speech
  • Bethany Plain
    Amsterdam UMC, NL | Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, DK
    The impact of social observation during a speech-in-noise task: insights from cardiovascular and pupil responses of listeners with hearing loss
  • Emmanuel Ponsot
    Ghent University, BE
    Impact of cochlear synaptopathy on speech-in-noise perception: Psychophysical and electrophysiological markers based on temporal fine structure coding fidelity
  • Cas Smits
    Amsterdam UMC, Dept. of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Amsterdam, NL
    A method to convert between Speech Recognition Thresholds (SRT) and percentage-correct scores for speech-in-noise tests

 

Last modified 2021-12-06 20:19:37